Intentions

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“Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other.” —-Abraham Lincoln 

Fresh starts. Transformations. New Year, new you. January hashtags are all about renewals and resolutions. But what does that even mean? A resolution assumes that there is something to resolve in our life but is that always the case at the start of the new year? It might not be.  

A blank slate.

The beginning of a new year can be a good time for reflections and setting intentions for the year.  What is an intention you ask?  It is a thing intended; an aim or plan. I’d like to think that intentions are where our dreams begin.   An intention can be something that you want to be mindful of throughout the year, it’s an abstract idea that we can consider when we make decisions. Within each intention, we can set objectives or markers for ourselves. 

Starting something new can be scary and intimidating. I challenge you to put the fear aside, and consider the possibilities for success when setting intentions for yourself. The intentions can be for whatever you decide: fitness, family or professional.

One of my intentions includes being more mindful of my time. For me, this includes limiting screen time, making time for more leisure reading, studying for my licensing exam, and saying yes/no to invites.

Here are some suggestions for being successful with setting intentions for the year:

Write down your goals / make them visible: Some people will buy a pair of jeans in a size that they want to be and hang them in a location easily seen every day. Try them on every couple of weeks and see how far you have come/how much you have to go.  Write a blog about your progress and advertise to others on Facebook or Instagram.  You will be surprised with the amount of support you can get from complete strangers when it comes to meeting fitness goals. I bought myself a chalkboard and wrote down my intentions for the year, they are in my room staring me straight in the face every day.

Have a team: In the past couple of weeks, several new members have joined our 101 class. This is the perfect place to connect with others who are committed to their fitness and who you can discuss goals with for the year. Some of my friends get together a create vision boards. Sharing your goals with someone can help you to stay on track.

Practice Everyday: Whatever the intention, improving mobility (joining a yoga class, signing up for RomWod, etc), complete accessory work for pull ups or rope climbs, or reading nightly, stay committed to the practice every day.

Remind yourself why you started: Keep yourself honest. Why do you really want to change? What was it that sparked your interest? Then keep reminding yourself about why, especially when you are feeling like staying home instead of to the grocery store for meal prep or going to the gym to sweat out the stress.

Check yourself: One of the biggest challenges that I had was asking for help, then after asking for the help, listening to it and shutting my mouth and consider the options that will work for me. I don’t know it all, even if I think I may know there is so much more to learn. When I follow the suggested tweaking from coaches at the box, when I take time to read articles on running skills and workouts, and when I ask questions, I find myself learning more about being a better athlete (I know, shocking).

The start of the new year (whether it’s January 1 or 28) can be the ideal time to redirect our investments towards our self and how we want to show up in the world. What do you want to change or improve? Let’s make it happen. #getsome